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The Whitney Museum And The MTA Bring Floral Artmaking To The Bronx At The New York Botanical Garden

All aboard “Whitney On The Rails!” Hop on the subway or Metro-North to join the Museum for nature-inspired art activities at The New York Botanical Garden in honor of the 2024 Whitney Biennial.

New York, NY, June 25, 2024 — The Whitney Museum of American Art is coming to the Bronx for a special artmaking project in honor of the 2024 Whitney Biennial at The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) on Saturday, June 29 from 11 am–2 pm. 

NYBG is the next stop on “Whitney On The Rails,” the Museum’s partnership with the MTA to bring art, artmaking, and the landmark Whitney Biennial directly to New Yorkers through all-ages artmaking activities in subway stations and at cultural institutions easily accessible by public transportation. The Garden is accessible by both subway and Metro-North. 

Artists of all ages are welcome to join us in NYBG’s Azalea Garden with roaming tour guides and to create watercolor landscapes and botanical illustrations, drawing inspiration from the scenic surroundings and artist Joseph Stella’s stunning piece from the Whitney’s collection, Mixed Flowers with Hydrangea (1919). This artwork, along with many others, was influenced by Stella’s regular visits to the NYBG. 

Find inspiration throughout the weekend at NYBG during Mad for Summer Weekend, taking place on June 29 and 30 from 1–4 pm with more family-friendly activities including hands-on crafts and activities. This event is included in a NYBG All-Garden Pass ticket, which this weekend is FREE for kids ages 12 and under who arrive in Wonderland-inspired attire. NYBG grounds are also always free for all Bronx residents. 

Facilitated by Whitney Museum educators, the artmaking project in the Azalea Garden is inspired by Stella, an Italian immigrant who—missing the plants from his native country—visited NYBG in the 1920s for artistic inspiration. One of the works based on these visits to the Garden—Neapolitan Song (1929)—was featured in the first-ever Whitney Biennial, a showcase of what’s new and exciting in contemporary American art, and a part of the NYC cultural landscape since 1932. The 2024 Whitney Biennial is currently on view at the Whitney at 99 Gansevoort Street (closest to the ACE lines and 14th Street station) through August 11.

For New Yorkers looking to explore more about the Biennial’s history in New York City, they can visit whitney.org/map or the Whitney’s guide on the Bloomberg Connects app to see a digital map that showcases the long history of the Whitney Biennial in New York City and invites viewers to discover the locations of NYC spots depicted by Biennial artists, public art by Biennial artists, NY subway stations that include artworks by Biennial artists as part of the MTA’s Art and Design program, and much more. 

Event Details

New York Botanical Garden

2900 Southern Blvd, Bronx, NY 10458 

(accessible by subway and Metro-North)

June 29, 2024

11 am–2 pm

Additional information about the event is available on the Museum’s website at whitney.org. Registration is not required. Artmaking is included in NYBG All-Garden Pass ticket, which is FREE this weekend for kids ages 12 and under who arrive in Wonderland-inspired attire. NYBG grounds are also always free for all Bronx residents. 


PRESS CONTACT

For press materials and image requests, please visit our press site at whitney.org/press or contact: 

Ashley Reese, Director of Communications 

Whitney Museum of American Art 

(212) 671-1846

Ashley_Reese@whitney.org 

Whitney Press Office 

whitney.org/press

(212) 570-3633

pressoffice@whitney.org 


ABOUT THE WHITNEY

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875–1942), houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Mrs. Whitney, an early and ardent supporter of modern American art, nurtured groundbreaking artists when audiences were still largely preoccupied with the Old Masters. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for ninety years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.

Whitney Museum Land Acknowledgment

The Whitney is located in Lenapehoking, the ancestral homeland of the Lenape. The name Manhattan comes from their word Mannahatta, meaning “island of many hills.” The Museum’s current site is close to land that was a Lenape fishing and planting site called Sapponckanikan (“tobacco field”). The Whitney acknowledges the displacement of this region’s original inhabitants and the Lenape diaspora that exists today.

As a museum of American art in a city with vital and diverse communities of Indigenous people, the Whitney recognizes the historical exclusion of Indigenous artists from its collection and program. The Museum is committed to addressing these erasures and honoring the perspectives of Indigenous artists and communities as we work for a more equitable future. To read more about the Museum’s Land Acknowledgment, visit the Museum’s website.


VISITOR INFORMATION

The Whitney Museum of American Art is located at 99 Gansevoort Street between Washington and West Streets, New York City. Public hours are Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 10:30 am–6 pm; Friday, 10:30 am–10 pm; and Saturday and Sunday, 10:30 am–6 pm. Closed Tuesday. Visitors eighteen years and under and Whitney members: FREE. The Museum offers FREE admission and special programming for visitors of all ages every Friday evening from 5–10 pm and on the second Sunday of every month.

Image credit:

Joseph Stella, Neapolitan Song, 1929. Oil on canvas, 38 3/8 x 28 1/4 in. (97.5 x 71.7 cm.). Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Françoise and Harvey Rambach

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